Voyage of Damned (simmer the ingredients for 20 minutes…) Monday, Aug 31 2009 

So while waiting for some queries to run at work, I had a flash for my game based on all the ruminating in my last post (https://chefjb.wordpress.com/2009/08/31/which-ingredie…bring-the-heat/).

Premise: A ship full of zombies trying to remove their curse so they can return home

Structure:There are three time periods of play and three major Events.  Play starts in the PRESENT (sailing towards home and working to remove the curse), with flashbacks to the PAST court intrigues that led up to the voyage, and all building towards the CONCLUSION when the curse is resolved… or the crew is doomed forever.  The flashbacks (PAST) will begin in the courts full of intrigue and lead up through the destination of the initial voyage and the TRANGRESSION that led to them being cursed.  The voyage home (PRESENT) will begin with the voyage home already underway and will go through the struggles of the voyage (sort of like Homer’s The Odyssey) and will end with their HOMECOMING (tied to the TRANSGRESSION structurally).  The CONCLUSION of both other timelines will play out the TRANSGRESSION and HOMECOMING and will determine whether they remove the curse and go home or are damned forever to wander as a ship full of zombies.

The Characters: The player characters are not the crew of the ship (though the crew shares their fate), they are powerful people who intrigued to get the voyage launched in the first place and then led the expeditions personally, whatever the reasons.  The reasons for the voyage, the characters’ role in the voyage, the cause and source of the curse, and the resolution will all be created in play.  At the start, only a handful of pertinent traits will be defined (likely as simple as an archetypal role–The Priestess, The Conqueror, The Explorer, etc.).  None of this is to say the crew is irrelevant.  Instead they are expendable, literally.  As the quest to remove the curse and get home is played out, crew members can be EXPENDED for some system or narrative power (no idea what yet, but thinking of Homer’s Odyssey and the “expendable crew” trope has me really wanting to make it a mechanic).
As for the ingredients…

Intrigue will tie very heavily into the Past/Flashbacks portion of the game.  I see the first portion of the Flashbacks being an in-game contest as different characters scheme to shape the voyage to their own goals.  Similarly, in the Present/Voyage Home, they’re still going to have different goals and reasons, though they’re also forced to work together to succeed and get home.

Dividers as used to measure divide a path into segments 9easy to correspond with legs of the journey)–I think I’ll do something with the scene structure and switching back and forth between the present and flashbacks based on that).

The Fleur-de-Liswill probably tie to the initial court intrigues and setting up the voyage and  transgression that causes the curse.  I have some very rough ideas, including some I’ve posted before, but it’s all pretty vague at this point.  Then again, I’m leaning towards the details being worked out in game, so it may be presented as a vague ingredient that the players have to work in to the flashbacks… we’ll see.

The Seabirds will probably tie into the voyage home, and be tied to the curse intimately.  As such, they’ll be tied intimately to the present voyage home portion of play.

The Starwill probably be tied to both the intrigue portion and the initial voyage up to the Transgression (in other words to the flashback).  Structurely I’m seeing the star in the flashbacks/initial voyage and the seabirds in the present/voyage home playing contrasting but complimentary roles.
Obviously still pretty rough, but I’m getting excited.

-John B.

Which ingredients bring the heat? Monday, Aug 31 2009 

I’ve been going over the theme and ingredients to figure out which ones to use.  My first reaction was luke-warm, but I’m warming up as I dig in.  I’m not decided on anything yet, but some ideas are percolating.  To start, I’m assuming I’ll use all the ingredients and the theme (though I may cut one or two as  I go).  Oh, and “protagonists as zombies” jumped out at me when I began getting into the mariner headspace… so protagonists zombies, here we come 😀

  • Theme: Intrigue – The first thing I told myself going in is to be careful not to get too caught up in setting or premise until I figured out what the game would be.  It’s not  just supposed to be pretty or fascinating (though those sure aren’t bad things), it’s supposed to be fun and playable and it’s supposed to belong to the group playing instead of me.  Well, “Intrigue” helps tell me what the game’s going to be.  The players are going to intrigue (probably their characters will, too, but that’s still to be seen).
  • Ingredient: Fleur-de-Lis – I started with the Wikipedia link in the Game Chef site.  I’m not interested in the obvious French associations (though I reserve the right to change my mind).  Instead, the religious components jumped out at me, particularly it’s association with feminine virtue and spirituality.
  • Ingredient: Dividers – This is the ingredient I think is coolest for some reason, but I don’t really have a lot of ideas yet.  Measuring distances by walking the dividers across a map… I’ll figure outa way to make it work.
  • Ingredient: Seabird – Keeping with the sailing motif most the ingredients have, and digging into the Wikipedia entry again, the relationship between sailors and certain seabirds (especially albatrosses) jumped out at me.  The superstitions against harming certain seabirds and following seabirds to food or shore seems cool.  Keeping intrigue in mind, opposing religions or maybe sects within religion came to mind.  Sailors as men and the women playing some other role (based on the fleur-de-lis) also is gurgling aroun in my head.  I’m not sure what will float to the top yet.
  • Ingredient: Star – My first thought is to tie this to the seabirds in religious symbology.  But like the divider, stars are heavily tied to the mechanics of early navigation.  Those aren’t exclusive uses.  Hmm.  I’d like to do more with it, though.  Stars also evoke astrology or meteors, bright new stars, and other signs in the heavens that suggesst portents to travel in a certain direction (like over sea…), etc.  Possibly portents read in different ways by different groups… or even hinting that certain events in the near future could determine the destiny of nations (something worth intriguing over, for sure :D)
  • Extra Spice: Zombie protagonists (Archeological and Zombiological Sciences medal) – Mariner zombies are cool to me.  So how do zombie protagonists tie to an intrigue game involving sailing, portents in the heavens, and competing religions?  A bunch of ideas are percolating.  I like tying zombies to seabirds. It feels sort of evocative of stories like the Crow movie, with a nautical flavor.  Also, seabirds that migrate over the sea and back has a lot of cool potential for traveling back and forth between the worlds of the living and the dead.  Alternately, seabirds could be oposed to zombies–we’ll see what shakes out better.  As for the other group(s), do they have zombies, too?  Most likely.  Going back to the Fleur-de-Lis… raising from the dead done by “virtuous” women figures is intersting and there are some twists I could do with that.  the other variant is that virtuous, spiritual women become zombies with the fleur-de-lis tied in symbolically or literally.  Hmm, I’ll have to see how everything else shakes out.  So… why zombies and why zombie protagonists?  The three ideas that come first to mind are: a) if zombies raised from the dead are “chosen” with religious overtones (both the “seabird zombies” and the “fleur-de-lis zombies”), but competing religions or sects, then they could be in leadership roles (whether overt or more hidden) and be the intriguers, b) zombies are the “cannon fodder” on both sides of the conflict (maybe as the sailors–the don’t get scurvy, they just rot), or b) the entire setting takes place in the land of the dead (or rather the seas of the dead).

All of the above is (obviously) just ramblings and early musings.  I may do something very similar to all of that, or go a different direction.  But I’m liking what I’m seeing.

-John B.

Tag! Monday, Aug 31 2009 

I hereby tag in to Game Chef 2009. 🙂  Let’s get cooking!